Paper Fibres Inc. Corporate History

Department-of-public-worksPaper Fibres Inc. (PFI) is a family owned recycling company that has been serving the Canadian market for three generations. Incorporated in 1888 under the laws of Toronto, our core business today is the same as when we began – quality service in paper recycling.

Worker Operates a Forklift in a Warehouse Full of Waste Paper for Recycling

Today, the company and its capabilities have grown, with a 120,000 sq. ft. processing plant in Mississauga at highways 401 and 407, and additional plants in Buffalo and New York City. Despite this expansion, we’ve remained true to our heritage. While PFI ships paper globally, 80% still goes to Canadian-owned, domestic mills, creating local jobs and prosperity. We’re dedicated to supporting the communities that have helped us become a global success.

We’re also dedicated to significant reductions in environmental impact and protecting Canada’s natural resources. By recycling paper and
200517601-001plastic products, we, along with our forward-thinking customers, are having a major impact on Canada’s water and woodlands. Recycling 1 ton of paper reduces water pollution by 35%, air pollution by 74% and 4,800 kWh of energy is saved – enough to power an average household for 7-months.

That’s just the beginning. See our services to find out what PFI can do for your business or organization, and the impact we can help you have for all Canadians, today and tomorrow.

About Recycling

What we do
Why we should all recycle
How is paper recycled?
What gets made out of recycled paper?

What we do
dv1821009Paper Fibres Inc. is known in the industry as a “Grader, Packer and Broker”. All the paper we process in our plant, be it dropped off or picked up in one of our 16 trucks, is separated into its grade type, (graders). Once separated we bale these types of paper, (packers) and ship them to Paper Mills all over the world. We also market baled paper for government and private industries. (Brokers)

Why we should all recycle
banner_lPaper recycling is very important to the environment. Each ton of paper we recycle saves approximately 19 trees; it also saves 90 cubic feet of landfill space. One acre of trees remove up to 2.6 tons of carbon dioxide, and one tree produces 260 pounds of oxygen per year. One sheet of paper can be recycled 7 times, that is to say that after 5 to 7 times through the recycling process individual paper fibres in the sheet become too small and slip through the screen with the waste water. Paper Mills that use recyclable paper rather than trees use less electricity and water and produce less air and waste water pollutants.

How is paper recycled?

 

Shredded Documents

There are many different types of paper but generally the principle of how they are recycled is the same. The paper mills cut the bales of paper open and dumps them into a huge vat of circulating water. Think of a huge slow moving blender. The paper is then turned into a mash. From there it passes through a screen, which removes any non-paper products like glass, non-water soluble glues, stables, and other contaminates. The mash is now sprayed onto a felt conveyor and two rollers along the conveyor squeeze out approximately 50% of the water. The conveyor belt then runs through huge dryers, which can be 50 feet or more in length. The paper is then collected on rolls.

What gets made out of recycled paper?
sorting_boxboardThere are many different products made out of recycled paper. The shingles on your house are most likely made out of a recycled cardboard / newsprint mix, which is then dipped in asphalt, sprayed with tar and sprinkled with small stones.

Newspaper is generally made into more newsprint. There are many paper mills which use 100% recycled paper to make their newsprint.

Fine papers, like writing paper, posters etc., are generally used to make the tissue grades, paper towel, bathroom tissue and napkins.

Cardboard is generally made into cardboard but can be used to make a host of things such as boxboard, brown napkin, shingles, paper bags, etc.